Paintball Selection Tips For New Players

Even for experienced players, buying the right paint is a tedious process.

Choosing the right paintballs for your desired application, marker, and game environment is one of the biggest components of your game. The right paint in the right marker, applied in the right situation can make a big difference in game outcome.

Go down to a local paintball shop and take a look at what’s offered. Don’t have a local shop? Head over to our website and look at all of the different choices.

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Starting them down is tough. Are the most expensive paintballs better than cheaper alternatives? What does “Tournament Grade” mean? Here are some tips you can use to help decide which paintballs are the best for you.

Think About What You Are Going To Do With It

Are you playing a PSP match or are you introducing your little brother to paintball in your backyard?

This part is simple. If you’re just using your marker in a situation where accuracy doesn’t matter or the stakes aren’t high, you’re better off saving money and going with the cheaper stuff.

If you’re new to paintball, you’ll have to realize that paint is going to be your biggest investment over the course of your career. Regardless of how much your marker cost—or anything else you spend your money on—you need paint to play. Save money when you can.

Can Your Paintball Gun Handle Brittle Paint?

This gets to the “Tournament Grade” or “Professional Grade” paintball question.

Here’s the tip, before you go and spend $75.00 on Empire Evil Tournament Grade Paintballs ask yourself if your marker can handle fragile paint.

The difference between run-of-the-mill stuff and Tournament Grade paint is in how easily it breaks on contact. You pay more for more fragile paint.

The problem is that your Tippmann 98 is going to tear Tournament Grade paint apart. You’ll need a more expensive marker that’s easier on paint if you want to shoot expensive paint. Even then, you don’t need Empire Evil when you want to shoot a tree in the backyard.

Weather Considerations

How hot is it?

How cold?

This one is simple. Avoid the expensive thin-shell paint in the colder months. It’s going to expand with the cold, become brittle and break.

Thin paint is great for hot and humid days. Humidity will make the shell of a paintball softer and harder to break on impact.

Sourcing Paint And Age

Paintballs are not like wine. They don’t get better with age.

You want fresh paint.

Paintballs that sit around for a long time deform under their own weight. That alters how they shoot and the chances of breakage in your marker.

This is why you should always buy your paintballs from a source that you trust. Go ahead and order from our website—you can even give us a call if you want to ask how old the paint you are getting is.

Better yet, head down to a trusted local shop and ask them about the age of the paint you are buying.

Whatever you do, don’t get your paintballs from a big box retailer. Chances are that it’s been sitting around in a warehouse for months or maybe even a year before it even hit the shelf. Big retail stores that don’t specialize in paintball don’t know how to properly store it, don’t understand how delicate it is, and order in huge quantities to save on cost.

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