Lens Tint Differences? It’s Not About The Looks

Why do manufacturers make different lens colors? I’ll tell you this—it isn’t for style points. All the different lenses you see in masks? They all have a purpose. They all do something.

Most of the best players I know are pretty serious about goggle choice. From comfort to functionality and lens color. They end up acquiring as many lens tints as possible. The last thing they care about are style points. Style doesn’t win matches.

What’s the best lens tint? It depends on the situation.

Let’s start with Mirrored Lenses:

29031106-1_large

They look cool, right? Sure. Everyone loves to see their reflection in your mask. Put them on during a dark day or an indoor game to look cool and you’ll be screwed. Mirrored lenses are often the darkest. They block the most light. You likely won’t need them until a really sunny day rolls around or if you want to play in the snow. That’s actually the only time I use mine.

What about Clear Lenses?

29300705-2_large_4177

Clear lenses are my everyday go-to lens. They can cover every situation effectively—mostly because they are clear. If you only have one set of lenses, you have to take this route. Clear lenses are perfect for 60-80% of the field conditions most players experience—they are really fine for everything except the most sunny days.

Smoke Lenses:

29370218-2_large_4198

Smoke or gray-tint lenses is one of the first colors you should get after clear. They provide adequate sun protection will still giving you clear definition and true colors. The biggest benefit to smoke lenses is that they help keep you from squinting on sunny days. Don’t use them inside though—I guess you can but you’re not going to be able to see anything.

Amber or Orange Lenses: 

29370130-2_large_4196

Orange is, in my opinion, the most useful color to get if you’re going to do anything after clear or smoke. Amerish/orange tint helps improve your ability to focus in dim conditions or when it is hazy outside. They also help improve your depth perception. It’s about increasing the reds you see and limiting the colors that block your ability to focus. They also help improve your ability to see things move quickly.

You’ll notice that a lot of professional marksmen use orange tint glasses in shooting competitions. There’s a reason for it. They help improve focus.

The rest of the rainbow: Blue, Red, Green

29370633-1_large

 

You see these colors everywhere. Personally, I think they are pretty useless. Clear, Mirrored, Smoke and Orange/Amber lenses will cover everything you need. Green is good for blocking light on sunny days, but you already have mirrored for that. Red supposedly filters out light that improves sharpness—amber works the same but does it better. You don’t see any marksmen with red lenses. Blue reduces glare, but—come’on they are blue. I think they look silly, and honestly, you’re not going to find many practical situations where they are better than amber lenses for improving perception.

Which Ones Do You Buy?

Doesn’t matter to me—we want you to buy them all obviously. If you’re new to paintball, clear is the way to go. After that, get smoke for sunny days. Amber should be next if you want to see movement better and sharpen up your depth perception. Mirrored? Sure if you’re going to be playing on really sunny days. Everything else? Buy it to look cool

Why haven’t you subscribed on YouTube? You should also like us on Facebook. Remember to buy your lenses from our website. It’s how everyone at Hustle Paintball buys food and pays for beer.

Tip: Run Two Markers With This Ninja Product

run two markers

How bad ass is it when you are watching a film and the on-screen character kicks open a door and shoots up everyone in the room with two Desert Eagles in-hand? Or how bad ass is it when a film’s protagonist has two heavy-duty machine guns atop a moving truck, holds down the triggers, and lets the gun rip on everyone in his way? It’s moments like these that many of you have probably wanted to recreate out on the paintball field, and today, we’re bringing you a tip that allows you to potentially recreate these moments in your next game.

Continue reading

Fixing HK Army KLR Fogging Issues

We’ve heard about KLR fog issues and we think there is a solution. The HK Army KLR is an excellent mask—and, for many users, the fog shouldn’t be an issue after removing a small section of black plastic that shipped on many of the masks. Here’s what you need to do.

1. Take a look at the top of the mask to see if it shipped with a piece of plastic above the vent area. Without the plastic, your mask should look like the picture below.

Top Mask

2. If the piece of plastic is already removed, you shouldn’t have fogging problems. If it’s still there, you need to remove it for better ventilation. To remove the plastic vent cover, peel the forehead foam off the mask carefully.

Peel Foam

3. Use a pick or small flathead screwdriver to remove the plastic. It is anchored in the center of the vent area and to the sides. It should come right off.

4. Reattach the foam. The forehead foam should reattach well if you use a hairdryer to get the adhesive warm.

Reattach Foam

Give us a call or drop an email if you are having any trouble. If you break the forehead foam we have replacement foam available.

If you haven’t seen Reload #63 yet, video instructions for fixing KLR fogging problems are included. Check out the video below

Additionally, we are considering another Hustle Paintball game night, so head over to PbRiot and vote on the game night thread.

Stay tuned for more Hustle Paintball updates. Get at us on Facebook and subscribe on YouTube. We’ll keep you up-to-date on everything that’s happening in the world of paintball gear and Hustle Paintball.

Review: Morphfire for Autocockers

morphfire image

You have probably seen our review of the Morphfire (and if you haven’t, what are you waiting for turkey?). We had a ton of fun firing the Morphfire, so you may be wondering why we’re back plugging it all over again. Well, the team responsible for the Morphfire has finally made the Morphfire for markers with Autococker threads. Excited? You should be!

Continue reading

How to Fill a CO2 Tank via a Bulk Tank

filling co2 tanks image

If you play a lot of paintball (you’re reading a paintball blog so you obviously do, right?), then you have probably found yourself interested in filling your own tanks at home. Traveling to your nearest fill station can get expensive, time-consuming, and an inconvenience. Moreover, if you currently live in the middle of nowhere like I used to, then it becomes unfeasible to drive dozens of miles round trip to fill up your tank. I know where you’re coming from: I used to have to drive 80 miles round trip in my younger years just to get a tank refilled. Believe me when I say I would have seriously considered giving away one of my body parts to be able to fill up my tank at home.

Continue reading

Tippmann Cronus Review: The Best Paintball Gun for Beginners?

What’s up with the Tippmann Cronus? We took a quick look at it in CBTC #3 a few days ago, now you can see Jeff giving you the full rundown. Check out the video below.

A lot of people have been calling and emailing to ask what this new paintball gun is all about. As we mentioned a few days ago, it doesn’t have revolutionary internals—it’s a Tippmann 98 in a new body. We aren’t encouraging you to hate it. That’s actually a good thing. It’s actually the best paintball gun for beginners. Here’s why.

Reason 1: Reliability of Tippmann 98

Every paintball field everywhere rents Tippmann 98s. Reliability is the reason. Paintball fields want people to get into paintball; they want renters to have a good time. The Tippmann 98 is one of the most popular paintball guns of all time because it reliably produces good experiences.

They are actually hard to break. With limited maintenance they will run forever. The best paintball gun for beginners is the one that will work every time and is easy to take care of. The Cronus doesn’t require advanced mechanical knowledge to use or take apart. It will stand up to abuse. It will work weekend after weekend. The internals are proven—that’s why they rent 98s at every paintball field you go to.

Reason 2: Customization

The Cronus is the best paintball gun for beginners because you can customize it to suit your needs. The biggest problem we see with many entry-level paintball guns are simplistic “what you see is what you get” designs. Most inexpensive paintball guns come in one-size-fits-all packages that can’t be easily modified.

The Cronus is different. The tactical design can be customized to fit a variety of play styles. We’ll talk more about how we like it setup later—for now consider this important point: You don’t want to match your play style to your equipment, you want equipment that matches you. The Cronus includes more modification features than any inexpensive marker we’ve seen.

On top of being customizable, the Cronus shoots comfortably. The grip fits “right,” balance is good with the stock attached running remote, or with the stock removed and a tank attached.

Reason 3: Price

We don’t need to say more about this. The price is right. It’s a $79.00 paintball gun that you can extract much more than $79.00 of function from. My Tippmann 98 is 13 years old. It still works. Don’t knock something that is built on a reliable design.

How Should I set It Up?

Do you need the tactical version? Should you run a remote? These are the types of questions people have been asking alongside comments about the Tippmann 98 internals. The answer depends on your play style and the model you buy.

Removing the stock from the tactical version and attaching a tank places the marker at a perfect height for using the sights. Using the stock and tank is problematic—together they just get in the way. Another problem is that with a mask on, you can’t really see down the sights while using the stock. If you want to use the sights, take the stock off and use a tank. If you’re going to use the stock, run remote. Jeff provides a more extensive explanation in the video review.

The Best Beginner Paintball Gun?

Sure. If you are looking for something flashy the Cronus isn’t it. For a new player who wants something that is going to be fun, comfortable, customizable, and work every time you pull the trigger, the Tippmann Cronus can’t be beat. The people that will knock the Tippmann 98 internals are likely to already own a flashy expensive electronic marker. This paintball gun was built for beginners who want quality, reliability, and functionality at a rock bottom price.

Order the tactical or basic version now from our website. We think you should run it with HPA using NInja’s 48 cu tank for the best affordable results. If you’re going to run remote, get a good harness like the NXe 4+1 (at $25 it can’t be beat) and a decent remote line with disconnect.

Guerrilla Air Pro 3000psi Compressed Tanks – Less Than a PS4 Game

guerrilla air 3000 psi image

Yeah, we get it – that new PS4 game is looking pretty fly (or that Xbox One/PC game, whichever army you’re in). But come on guys, what would you rather have? A video game that’s going to get stale after a few weeks, or a gift that will keep on giving like a 3000psi compressed air tank?

Continue reading

Hustle Reload 62

Sun’s out? Guns out. Winter is over and we are excited for better weather. This week on the Hustle Reload we have an arm wrestling competition and a rap battle. Between we assemble a Milsig M17 DMR that just arrived, take a look at some Custom CCM T2 pump markers and take out a FedEx delivery driver during an orange smoke grenade test. Here’s the video:

Custom CCM T2

Let’s start by talking about the custom CCM T2 pump marker. CCM makes the best pump paintball guns you can buy. Many people already know about the advantages of the CCM T2. To us, they are less like paintball guns and more like works of art. The T2 is smooth, the action is satisfying—there is really nothing else like it. If you don’t want one, you’re crazy.

10890196-0-5_large6

Check out a couple customized CCM T2s in this week’s reload. Lust after them for a few seconds, and then think about how cool it would be to have your own custom T2. They take a while to come in, but you can get a T2 built exactly the way you want it. Virtually everything is customizable. Check out our T2 order page for more info.

The CCM customizer tool can help you figure out exactly how badass your T2 can look. You’ll probably want to call to order—because when you do you’ll get to pick everything.

M17 DMR Arrives

We also received the M17 DMR from Millsig. Finally. We aren’t sure if it is completely ridiculous or cool—likely it is a match between the two. If you want a well-built sniping machine that is completely outrageous the M17 is for you. Your likely going to do plenty of your own research before buying it—but here is one thing that Milsig didn’t tell us that you should know before you order: You’ll have to pick up a ladder to attach the 400mm barrel. We haven’t seen a Little Giant ladder infomercial in a while but it seems like the best choice—a nice compact design that will fit right in with your sniper kit.

John Dresser of PbNation

You should check out our exclusive interview with John Dresser where we asked all of the tough questions the community at PbNation have been waiting to hear. We discovered that he prefers hand dryers, can’t remember Home Alone 3, and that PbNation is really a peanut butter forum. Check out the interview:

Review: Ninja Universal Tank Cover

ninja cover

Just like us humans need clothes (some certainly more than others), so too does your tank need to cover up. Most of us prefer to wear at least some sort of clothing when we’re out in public, and your tank is the same way. Besides, if you were playing in a game of paintball, wouldn’t you want to wear some sort of clothing? Of course you would (and if you think otherwise, you’re crazy). Your tank is the exact same way. It wants covering, it wants to be warm, and it wants to be protected from stray paint in the event that it’s smacked.

Continue reading

Tippmann Cronus Tactical Paintball Gun

The Tippmann Cronus is available and in stock now. It comes in two versions—the Cronus Tactical and the Cronus Basic. The tactical has a kick ass design—it’s the model you want if you order this marker. We’re going to get to a full video review later on, but for now you can catch a glimpse of the Tippmann Cronus in CBTC #3 on YouTube:

So, what’s the deal? Is obvious that milsim is popular and the tactical style is “cool” right now. Tippmann is picking up on it and released the Cronus Tactical to tap into the market with an inexpensive milsim paintball gun.

The Cronus is made from a high-impact composite black and tan boy (we might just spray paint ours all black). The tactical version includes a mock silencer, 6-position stock, vertical grip, and a carry handle with built-in sights. There are four rails for attaching AR-style accessories. The barrel is ported on the end. The gas line is internal and the bolt is an in-line design.

10462652-0-2

Bottom line: The Tippmann Cronus is basically a Tippmann 98 crammed into a new shell. It’s a proven design that some people love and other people love to hate. Like it or not—it’s still a quality marker. It shoots paint, it’s durable, and—for $109.00—it does it in affordable style.

The body on the Cronus Tactical adds a good amount of functionality and a cool look (as soon as we paint it all black). It’s comfortable and it feels well-balanced.

The Tippmann Cronus is the perfect marker for a friend who wants to give paintball a try. It has the “look” everyone is after, the price is right, and with proven internals it will be durable enough to stand up to some good abuse. Some of us still have Tippmann 98s that are over 15 years old and still chugging out paint like the day they were new.

Visit our website to order the Cronus Basic or the Cronus Tactical. They both shoot paint. Buy it for your little sister, get her into paintball, it’s only $109.00.

Subscribe on YouTube and “friend” us on Facebook for the latest reviews and updates.